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Status Go - “Race in Tech: Inside the Numbers” with Vinay BhagatStatus Go – Episode 95

There is a wonderful analogy from Jonathan Haidt, a psychologist at NYU, used to describe the two sides to our brain, the logical and the emotional. Haidt compares our brain to an elephant and a rider. The rider represents the logical side of our brain and the elephant the emotional. To affect change, you have to appeal to both the elephant and the rider, both must want to go down the path. In this episode, we speak to the rider, the logical side. My guest is Vinay Bhagat, Founder, and CEO of TrustRadius, one of the most trusted review sites for business technology, serving both buyers and vendors. Trust Radius recently released the results of a comprehensive survey of race in tech. Their 2020 People of Color in Tech Report is a wealth of data…just what the rider needs! 

Vinay and I dig into some of the survey results that jumped out at me when I read the report: the disconnect between unconscious bias in hiring and promotion and the perception of the white respondents; the feeling that half the people of color have when it comes to reporting discrimination in the workplace; the effectiveness of Diversity, Equality & Inclusion initiatives; and, the encouraging news there is an improvement in some of the numbers. 

Listen in as we discuss these results and more! You can read the full report here: 2020 People of Color in Tech Report

Status Go is the weekly podcast from InterVision. We provide actionable insights from technology leaders to technology leaders who want to break out of the status quo and lead their businesses into the new future. Listen to more of our episodes here: https://www.intervision.com/statusgo-podcasts/

#AmplifyYourLeadership Status Go – Episode 77

From the outset, this conversation was personal, deeply personal. Terry Morris, director of global services and digital solutions for Eli Lilly and Company and serves as the national president for BDPA (Black Data Professionals Associates) takes us on the journey of being a black leader in tech. 

After explaining his comment of “as a black leader, I have been conditioned not be a black leader”, he describes his personal approach to assessing situations and how much of the real Terry Morris he will let people see. We also dive into the recent attack he suffered will riding his bike. 

Always positive, Terry provides insight into the BDPA and how all of us (including old white dudes, like me) can get involved, either through a local chapter or by attending the upcoming virtual summit (www.BDPA2020.com). He leaves us with a call to action: a call to lean in! 

Status Go is the weekly podcast from InterVision. We provide actionable insights from technology leaders to technology leaders who want to break out of the status quo and lead their businesses into the new future. Listen to more of our episodes here: https://www.intervision.com/statusgo-podcasts/

Status Go – Episode 72

#RaceinTechOK, I am a white host of a podcast, representing a predominately white company (InterVision) in an essentially white industry (tech). The last several weeks have forced me to confront my own inaction. In this episode, I sit down with Lamont Hatcher, CIO, and Wayne Patrick, CRO, both of AIS, an IT Managed Service company. We get honest and we get raw about their experience of being black in tech, being black in America, and being leaders of change. 

If you are like me and want to learn and want to grow, you will want to listen. We cover aspects of their careers, how they persevered, and how they grew to be the leaders they are today. Lamont and Wayne also share some great insights for what we as tech leaders, as business leaders, and as human beings can do to turn the tide and make a difference. 

Status Go is the weekly podcast from InterVision. We provide actionable insights from technology leaders to technology leaders who want to break out of the status quo and lead their businesses into the new future. Listen to more of our episodes here: https://www.intervision.com/statusgo-podcasts/

#AmplifyYourLeadership #BlackLivesMatterLast week’s Leadership Thought “I Have No Words” sparked a lot of email, texts and comments. Many of you, like me, are struggling to find the words, to know how to react to the unrest around us, and to know what actions to take. Many of the messages contained an explicit or implicit question: But, what about the violence and the looting? 

Let me respond, first by saying, I am a self-proclaimed pacifist. I abhor violence and destruction of any kind. I wish we all could just get along (you know, hold hands and sing “Kumbaya”). I wish that for the neighbors in a dispute, our political parties, the countries of the world, and certainly the races of the world. Like John Lennon I “Imagine all the people living life in peace”. 

However, I am also a realist. There are wars (and, yes, I wholeheartedly support our troops, I come from a long line of those who have served our country), there is conflict, and yes, there are riots, violence and looting. History is filled with examples of rioting and looting going back thousands of years. 

Don’t believe me? Google “riots throughout history”. There are so many of them, they had to divide them up by century. There were riots in Rome when Julius Caesar was assassinated.There were riots in Canada after a loss in the Stanley Cup. There were riots in the U.S. over a tax on…whiskey. 

The Boston Massacre occurred because colonists were frustrated with the presence of British Soldiers in their neighborhoods and threw snowballs at Soldiers. The soldiers responded and killed five colonists. 

The Boston Tea Party was a result of growing resentment between the colonies and British taxation. 342 chests of tea were dumped into Boston Harbor. It started a revolution. 

As my wife and I watched Ken Burns’ Civil War this week, I was reminded of the riots that took place in the North in response to the draft of Union soldiers. 

As I researched this post, I learned of “Red Summer”, a series of riots and looting in over three dozen cities that took place 100 years ago at the end of World War I. Whites were fearful the black soldiers returning from the war would take their already scarce jobs. (Interesting that was at the same time in history as the Spanish Flu pandemic…history repeats?) 

Riots and looting have occurred because of political differences, because of hatred of another people, because of team affiliations (football, soccer, basketball, hockey), and yes, because of race. Sometimes, the oppressed have rioted, and sometimes the aggressors have rioted. 

I have to ask the question, what would have happened if the armed protesters who protested in state houses recently against “stay-at-home” orders were met with aggression instead of silence? 

Would I ever feel anger or hopelessness, or feel passionately enough about a cause to resort to violence? I’d like to say “no”, but what I can say is “never say never”. 

I, for one, have felt anger. However, I can’t imagine what it feels like to be oppressed. Oppressed for hundreds or even thousands of years. I have felt hopelessness. However, I can’t imagine the hopelessness of generation after generation who are suffering and yet, are unheard. 

What I can do is listen with empathy and compassion to the voices of generations.